What Employees Should Know About Team Transfers

Whether voluntary or not, change in any capacity poses its challenges.  Nevertheless, alterations in our routine are certain to generate opportunities for development and expansion of knowledge.

In the workplace, we may choose to stay within our comfort zones; even preferring to trade a chance at professional growth for an existing sense of security.  However, quite commonly, we eventually reach a point where change is not only imminent, but necessary in order to begin the next chapter in our career. For those who are not quite ready to re-enter the job market, this next step may simply include transferring to a new team within their current organization. Thus, following some basic steps will make the shift significantly less taxing.

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Author and career content writer, Ryan Galloway, cites the valuable advice of Stephanie Linker, member of the global investment management corporation, BlackRock. It is there she lead a team responsible for event and mobile technology and even launched the company’s first mobile app.  After several years in this role, Linker knew she was ready to take on more responsibility, which soon characterized the next stage of her career.

1.  Build a sense of familiarity.

Linker recommends making the effort to meet as many individuals on various teams within your organization. Building and/or fine-tuning your own personal brand, while asking the right questions and seeking mentorship when necessary, will help provide the foundation you need to enter the next phase in your career. Linker suggests workers aim to gain insight on a team’s most significant needs and challenges, as well as working and leadership styles.

2.  Clearly – but carefully – express your intentions.

Galloway quotes Linker who affirms, “Communication is key when considering an internal move. How you convey the message that you’d like to work on another team can mean the difference between a smooth transition and messy break-up”. Expand upon the formally scheduled meetings and performance reviews, but refrain from directly asking for a transfer right away. Rather, focus on communicating your interest in the team with which you’d like to work, as well as your eagerness to gain knowledge on a larger portion of the company. Once it’s time to make the shift, the process will seem more natural, creating less static during the process.

3.  Consider your choices.

Before entirely committing to their pursuit, employees must ask themselves some fundamental questions regarding their potential transfer. These questions should include 1) whether the role will offer a sufficient level of challenge, 2) if it will help you grow professionally, 3) how it will fit within your lifestyle, 4) whether you will be gaining new skills or maximizing current ones, and 5) what you will be giving up by transferring to another team.

4.  Never “burn your bridges”.

Remaining on good terms with former team members is always recommended, but unlike starting a brand new job, a transfer means that you are still basically maintaining the same group of colleagues and coworkers. While your direct daily connections will change, you may still be dealing with the members of your former team on some level. Showing that you continue to be a supportive part of the whole will ease any tension as you learn to define your new role with new team members.

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Conclusion

As a final word, Linker offers the following advice to employees pondering the option of a team transfer: “You’ve got to ask for what you want. If you see a place where you can add value, you’ve got to raise your hand. No one’s going to hand you your next opportunity.” And we couldn’t agree more.

 

Fred Coon, CEO

 

Stewart, Cooper & Coon, has helped thousands of decision makers and senior executives move up in their careers and achieve significantly improved financial packages within short time frames. Contact Fred Coon – 866-883-4200, Ext. 200

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